Decoration Day 1869

May 30, 1868 was the first national commemoration of Memorial Day, when Union General John A. Logan, commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, set aside that day “for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, hamlet and churchyard in the land.”

At the time, there was no GAR post in Indiana County, so it is uncertain how the day was celebrated in the County.  However, there is an old postcard marked “First Decoration Day in Blairsville, Pa., 1868, in Market Square at Everett House.”  Later that year, on September 15, Kearney Post No. 28, GAR, was organized in Indiana.

For a number of years it was the only veterans’ organization in Indiana County. The first post commander was Col. Daniel S. Porter.  The other officers were Henderson C. Howard, senior vice commander; John Weir, junior vice commander; William R. Black, adjutant; Geoge A. McHenry, quartermaster; Dr. Robert Barr, surgeon; Theodroe Henderson, officer of the day; and John S. Fleming, officer of the guard.

When Memorial Day (also known as Decoration Day) came on May 29, 1869, Post 28 invited the other fraternal orders in Indiana to participate.  The Committee of Arrangements, consisting of George R. Lewis, S.A. Douglass, W.R. Loughry, Charles H. Row and William S. McLain, announced the following program:

            10am – The Post will meet at its hall and march to the Presbyterian Church followed by the others orders.

            At the church – Music on the organ titled “Lincoln’s Funeral March.” Reading of Gen. Logan’s general Order No. 21, Headquarters, GAR, and General Order No. 4, Headquarters, Department of Pennsylvania.  Prayer.  “Star Spangled Banner” by the choir.  Orations by Col. D.S. Porter and the Rev. J.H. Young.  Announce the order of procession to the cemeteries. Prayer.

            11am – Form in procession and march to the cemeteries.  A string band directed by H. Hargrave will halt at the head of each grave and play an appropriate march while the procession passes by on either side of the grave, each member dropping one or more flowers on the grave.  Return to the halls of the respective orders for dismissal.

The merchants of Indiana were requested to close between 10am and noon.  “It is hoped that so far as it is possible every one will join with us in strewing the graves with flowers, or dropping a tear over those who, when their country called, did not refuse to die.  Come one, come all, and make this one day sacred to the memory of our departed comrades.”  Afterward a complete account of the Memorial Day proceedings was published in the Indiana Register and American, occupying about four columns.

From this time on, similar ceremonies took place each year, and the day was long known as Decoration Day because of the custom of decorating the graves of soldiers with flowers. There were not nearly as many soldiers’ graves to be decorated then as now, only four years after the Civil War ended, so it was feasible to arch to each individual grave.

Unlike many other communities and counties, neither Indiana nor Indiana County ever erected a monument to its Civil War soldiers, but Saltsburg did on May 31, 1876, and that monument still stands in Edgewood Cemetery.

Civil War Monument Edgewood Cemetery, Saltsburg, PA

On that day, a few minutes after 3pm, the 8th and 9th Divisions, 13th Regiment of the Pennsylvania National Guard, took positions around the monument.  Division officers and bands were on the east side, the rank and file on the south and west sides, and an “immense throng of civilians” on the north side of the monument.

The 8th Division band played “a solemn dirge, the melancholy notes of which seemed to impress the vast audience with the full import of the occasion.”  This was followed by a prayer by the Rev. Adam Torrence.  Simon Portser, secretary of the cemetery board, read the list of contents of a box which had been sealed in the monument.

W.I. Sterett, president of the cemetery board, announced the officers of the day, including Major Samuel Cooper, a veteran of the War of 1812, president; nine vice presidents and two secretaries.  Adjutant General James W. Latta made brief remarks and unveiled the monument.  General Harry White delivered the dedicatory address, followed by the Rev. Major Core and Col. C.W. Hazzard.  Then the band played another selection and the Rev. W.W. Woodend pronounced the benediction.

Saltsburg on this occasion did not have GAR post, but the R. Foster Robinson Post 36 was organized the following year on July 5, 1877, and was the second GAR post in Indiana County.  Findley Patch Post 137, Blairsville, organized June 20, 1881, with 99 charter members and was followed soon by John Pollock Post 219, Marion Center, on August 20, 1881.

Several other GAR posts were organized in later years.  To each of them fell the responsibility of observing Decoration Day, and the pattern in all the communities for many years was similar to the one in Marion Center in 1883:

MEMORIAL DAY as observed in Marion

“Wednesday, Memorial day, was observed with marked attention at this place.  John Pollock Post, No. 219, GAR, having made necessary arrangements, met at their hall at 9 o’clock, when details were sent to Gilgal, Mahoning and Washington.  An audience was in attendance at each place, and after performing appropriate services, they returned to this place.

“At about 2 o’clock the Post, with a large number of citizens, assembled at the hall.  At 2:30 the procession, containing from three to four hundred persons, formed and headed by the Marion Cornet Band, which discoursed suitable music, marched to the cemetery.  After the usual services by the Post, the assemblage was addressed by Squire Kinnan of Gettysburg (now Hillsdale), after which the procession marched to the M.E. Church, where after music by the choir, W.L. Stewart, Esq., of Indiana, delivered the memorial address.  The oration was well delivered and was listened to with unusual attention by the large audience.  After the services in the church, the procession again formed and marched to the hall, where the audience was dismissed.”

As the ranks of the Civil War veterans thinned and aged, the responsibility for Memorial Day was assumed for some time by the Sons of Union Veterans and by their auxiliaries and then by the American Legion, VFW, and other veterans’ organizations.

Prior to the Civil War, there were no organized veterans’ groups in Indiana County.  The GAR might, therefore, be considered the inspiration and the ancestor of our present veterans’ organizations, who have adopted much the same type of organization and in some cases naming their posts in the same way for leaders or deceased members, for example, Joseph A. Blakley Camp 227, Spanish-American War Veterans, Indiana; Richard W. Watson Post 141 American Legion, Indiana; or John W. Dutko Post 7412, VFW, Homer City.

Another notable Memorial Day took place on May 30, 1925, when the Doughboy Monument in Indiana’s Memorial Park was dedicated.

The granite shaft was donated by the Farmers Bank of Indiana and the statute by Vernon Taylor.  A parade formed at the YMCA (now the Indiana Free Library) and marched to the park.  Richard W. Watson was chief parade marshal.  At 10 a.m. John S. Fisher gave an address.  The monument was presented and dedicated by Juliet White Watson and unveiled by the Gold Star Mothers.  James W. Mack, president of Indiana Borough Council, accepted the monument.  The Boy Scout Band provided music.

Doughboy Statute in Memorial Park

Accurate figures are not available for the number of Indiana County men and women who have served in our nation’s wars, but the 73 who served in the Revolution were buried in scattered cemeteries.  Forty-four served in the War of 1812 and an unknown number in the Indian wars.  About 20 were in the Mexican War.  The Civil War or “War of the Rebellion” called upon 3,680 Indiana County citizens, who served with great distinction.  One hundred eighty-three answered the call to the Spanish-American War.  Those who were in the World War II do not seem to have been tabulated correctly.  The number of World War II form Indiana County has been estimated at more than 13,000.  The number in the Korean and Vietnam wars is not available.

Major Samuel Cooper of Saltsburg, who died December 21, 1881, may have been the last veteran of the War of 1812. When Conrad Pifer of the Rochester Mills area died January 14, 1911, he was the last veteran of the Mexican War.  John C. Featherstone of 7 South Third Street, Indiana, was said to be “the only survivor of the Indian wars in this section” when he celebrated his 86th birthday in August 1938.

Dr. W.S. Shields of Marion Center, who died September 11, 1946, was the last of the Civil War veterans.

As we carry on the tradition of Memorial Day, it might be well to heed the admonition of General Logan in his first Memorial Day order in 1868: “Let no vandalism of avarice or neglect, no ravages or time testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten, as a people, the cost of a free undivided republic.”

Thank You Veterans!!

Veterans Day is the day that is set aside to remember all American veterans who have served.  The history of the holiday traces back to 1918, on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, of when an armistice was declared between the Allied nations and Germany in World War I.  The holiday became a federal holiday in 1938, and after the Korean War Armistice Day became known as Veterans Day.
Veterans Day is an important day for all of us to remember those who have lost our lives and thank those who are serving the country today. The day is marked by parades and commemorative ceremonies, the laying of the wreath at the tomb of the unknown soldier is one of those ceremonies that will take place. We have our memorial to the veterans here in Indiana County, located behind the Historical Society in Memorial Park.  In the center of the park stands a doughboy statue that was dedicated on Memorial Day 1925.
The doughboy in Memorial Park was made possible thanks to many community members including: Alex Stewart (Jimmy Stewart’s father), Steele Ober, A.F. Blessing, Samuel Wolfe, Harry Campbell, George K. Clark, Edgar Walker and Richard Watson. The column upon which the statue sits was originally part of the old Farmers’ Bank building on Philadelphia Street. Interestingly, it took a lot for the citizens of Indiana to put the statue up at the current site.
The land was owned, acquired by a gift, by the Lutheran church on which they began to construct a church, but ran short of funds and then planned to sell the trees and part of land to finance building on another part. A group of local veterans opposed selling the land and mounted a campaign to erect a memorial on the property.  Part of the group, led by Alex Stewart, began digging a hole for the pedestal’s foundation. Later that night the church group, filled in the hole; and once again the group dug the hole and the church group filled it in again.  However, this time the group erected a fence and placed a no trespassing sign at the site.  Eventually Indiana bought the land and the Doughboy statute was placed where Stewart and the group wanted it to be placed.

This Veterans Day enjoy the parade, and if you have time visit the Historical Society Museum where we have a wonderful display on the second floor dedicated to all Indiana County Veterans. Remember those who have lost their lives and thank those that are currently serving and have served.  From the staff and volunteers at the Historical Society we thank our veterans!

ABC Guide to the Indiana County Historical Society Part 2

Open. Yes we are open, come to our door at the Old Armory located from the parking lot from Wayne Ave.  Our hours are 9-4 Tuesdays to Fridays and 10-3 on Saturdays.
Quiet! Some days at the Society are very quiet with no visitors and a very small number of volunteers.  It’s hard to understand why, but it is something we have learned to accept because the next day there could be a dozen or more visitors.
Restrooms. One of the most frequent questions is where are the restrooms?  Well, actually they are right inside the door you came in; you can’t miss them!
Stephenson, thanks to Clarence Stephenson we have an extensive five volume history of Indiana County. These massive books catalogue the County’s history from the Native Americas up until the 175th Anniversary of the County in the 1970s.  He answers the main questions: who, what, when, where, but leaves you to determine the why; presenting only the facts.
Tours! It’s hard to believe but the Historical Society gets visitors from all over the United States, so schedule your tour today (if you are bringing a large group), otherwise come in any time during our regular business hours.
Up. There’s nowhere to go but up.  As time goes on preservation techniques becomes better and more history is able to be discovered.  Stay tuned for future events as we continue upward.
Veterans. We have a whole section devoted to honoring our veterans.  Visit the second floor of the armory to see artifacts and uniforms of those who have served from the French and Indian War to the latest war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many who come to see the displays are very proud to report it is one of the best displays they have ever seen.  This is our way to honor and thank those who have served for our nation’s freedom.
Walking Tour. There is so much history to see along historic 6thStreet; Governor John Fisher lived here – the only governor from Indiana County – he lived on 220 North Sixth Street.  There are many more historic buildings, stop by the historical society to learn more about the history. And again stay tuned as a guided walking tour is in the works.
(E)Xcited.  There is so much to be excited about, just this past year we debuted Indiana County-opoly game which was a huge success with over 500 games sold and still selling, get yours today at our Museum gift shop.  What the future brings excites us as there is always something new happening at the Society.
Years! Historical Societies are based on years.  The years everything happens are important to historians, because that is what tells a story from the beginning to the present.
Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! At the end of the day, it is always good to get some rest as volunteering and working with people is a tiring job. By getting a good night’s rest we are able to continue our mission the next day.  The best ideas come while sleeping.  Who knows what idea may pop into our heads tonight that we can share tomorrow to make the history of Indiana County come alive.