Indiana Glass

What is now Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s (IUP) Miller Stadium and parking lot, was one the location of a prominent business in Indiana, the Indiana Glass Company. Beginning in 1892 and continuing until 1931, there were a total of five different companies that manufactured glass.

The first of these glass companies was the Indiana Glass Company, which was in operation from 1892-1896. On January 1, 1892, a group of community leaders met with Mr. Nevill, a visiting glass expert, who had a proposal to build a glass factory that would be for manufacturing glass. $35,000 in stock was raised and the Indiana Glass Company was formed. Harry White, W.B. Marshall, Griffith Ellis, Thomas Sutton, John S. Hastings, H.W. Wilson, and Delos A. Hetric were named as directors and Harry was elected president and authorized the raising of capital stock to $50,000. The total cost for building and equipping the factory was $29,000. Sadly, the Indiana Glass Company was not successful financially and it was sold in October 1895 at a Sheriff’s sale.

workers
Company glass workers taking a break, possibly at the Pan American Exhibition.

Following was the Northwood Glass Company, in operation from 1896-1899. Harry C. Northwood, an English immigrant, was the founder of the Northwood Glass Company. Harry leased the Indiana glass plant in February 1896 and glass production resumed once again in Indiana that March. Harry’s father, John Northwood, was an innovator in acid etching of glass and invented a template machine for decorating.  Harry Northwood went on to establish many other glass factories. Mr. Northwood employed his cousin, Thomas E. Dugan, as plant foreman. Harry considered moving his glassworks to Blairsville, but thankfuly in 1898 an agreement was reached with Indiana Borough Council, so that Thomas Dugan, and Harry and Clara Northwood could purchase the factory.

In 1899, the Northwood Glass Company was sold to the National Glass Company of Pittsburgh. However, Thomas Dugan remained in control of the Indiana factory and operated it from 1900-1904.

A unique piece made by the glass company for the 1901 Pan American Exhibition in Buffalo, NY was a full-sized gown made of spun glass. AlAccording to Alfred Dugan’s wife Mayme, the dress would have “made them famous if it wasn’t for the assassination of President McKinley.” Alfred was one of the managers of the company at the time.

dress
The mannequin wearing a full-sized gown of spun glass.

In 1904, the plant again changed hands, when Thomas E.A. Dugan and several other investors purchased the factor creating the Dugan Glass Company, which remained in operation until 1913.  The Dugan Glass Company was best known for its production of carnival glass and introduced many different designs. On February 5, 1912, tragedy struck when a fire swept through the factory’s mold shop and destroyed many expensive glass patterns, causing $20,000 worth of damage. In 1913, the company again changed names, as Thomas Dugan sold the factory to Diamond Glassware Company.

The Diamond Glasware Company also produced carnival glass using many of the molds and patterns originally created by Thomas E.A. Dugan. They also introduced many new patterns as well. Miraculously the company continued producing through World War I and into the Great Depression, but disaster struck on June 27, 1931.  A fire destroyed most of the factory, this included the stockroom and $30,000 of finished glass. When all was said and done, the total loss was $100,000, and the factory closed permanently, thus ending almost 4 decades of glass production in Indiana, PA.

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hgsic

Through a broad range of activities, The Historical and Genealogical Society of Indiana County seeks to promote a greater appreciation of the Indiana community's rich heritage and a better understanding of life today.

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